Home Land Security

Since 2003, the FOR-SITE Foundation is dedicated to the creation, understanding and presentation of art about place. Its latest project is the exhibition “Home Land Security“ which takes place at Fort Winfield Scott at Langdon Court, a former military site on San Francisco Bay. It is open until December 18, 2016.

Battery Boutelle – for tourists in the San Francisco area it is best known as a location to take perfect shots of the Golden Gate Bridge. The art exhibition “Home Land Security“, which momentarily takes place at Fort Winfield Scott, a suite of decommissioned coastal batteries and buildings, focuses on a completely different subject. Occupying this former military site, it brings together 18 contemporary artists from 12 countries “to reflect on the human dimensions and increasing complexity of national security, including the physical and psychological borders we create, protect, and cross in its name“ (website for-site.org). The artworks encompass media ranging from painting and sculpture to video and performance.

“When you put art with nature and with history, then you bring the community to share that and have dialogue.“ – Kate Bickert (Director Park Initiatives and Stewardship, Golden Gate National Parks Conservatory)

For decades, the exhibition area used to serve as key sites in the US Army’s Coastal Defense System. It was built over a hundred years ago. With this exhibition, FOR-SITE has opened some of the buildings to the public for the first time. It is the foundation’s belief that art can inspire fresh thinking and start an important dialogue about our natural and cultural environment. And it is certainly not their first project of this kind. In 2014/15 they co-operated with Ai Weiwei, the internationally renowned Chinese artist and activist and turned Alcatraz Island, the notorious prison, with a series of new works into a national park. The project “@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz” attracted nearly 900.000 visitors.

The exhibition “Home Land Security” closes on December 18, 2016. It’s free and open from Wednesday to Sunday, 10 am – 5 pm.

More about the exhibition.

 

(Picture: Flickr_Peter Kaminski)